Connecting the Dots Blog

Hiring Hazards that Jeopardize a Job Interview

Hiring Hazards that Jeopardize a Job Interview

In my career at 15dots, I’ve had countless opportunities to serve on interview boards. As I welcome job candidates into an interview setting, I explain to them what to expect. Oftentimes, I tell them that everyone has a story to tell, and in this interview, you’ll have an opportunity to tell yours. I usually get a chuckle out of them when I say that I’ve done thousands of interviews, and nobody’s ever died during one of them!

Storytelling as an interview technique

A structured board interview designed by 15dots uses storytelling to determine a job candidate’s adaptation and motivation and how these behaviors match up with the targeted jobs. Serving on an interview panel is a huge responsibility, with specific Dos and Don’ts to keep in mind.

The Dos and Don’ts of Job Interviewing

Don’t ask a lot of questions

Instead of asking job applicants a bunch of questions, reframe the questions as gentle commands, which I call interview prompts. Start your command with words like, “Describe for me,” “Tell me about,” or “Give me a story about.” People often refer to this interview method as a behavioral interview. At 15dots, we developed a highly effective and repeatable interview protocol that includes more commands than questions. 

Do probe deeper with CARE®

As a follow-up to an interview prompt, you want to probe deeper into the candidate’s story by using the CARE® technique. CARE® is an acronym for Circumstance or Assignment, Response, and Effect. An example would be, “Tell me about a problem you had with a supervisor. What was the circumstance? What, if anything, did you do about it? What was the effect of your behavior?” 

Don’t ask illegal or in appropriate questions

Steer clear of asking illegal or inappropriate interview questions. Link to 5 Questions You Should Never Ask in a Job Interview Examples are, “Do you own a home?” “Do you go to church?” “Are you married?” “Do you have children?” In all likelihood, none of these questions are tied to the job itself. During interviewer training sessions, 15dots gives interviewers a quick-reference card that clearly spells out pertinent legal guidelines. By sticking to a prepared script of interview prompts, interviewers easily avoid any inappropriate or illegal interview questions. 

Do get personal – to a point

Some interviewers think that probing into a job candidate’s work life is too invasive. Sure, interviewers need to protect the privacy and integrity of an applicant. However, that doesn’t mean they can’t ask questions about attendance, physical capabilities related to the job, and safety. These factors are a prerequisite to performance. Examples of these types of prompts are: “Tell me about your safety record,” or “On any given day, how much are you required to push, pull, or lift?” or “Describe your attendance record over the past year.”

Do give neutral feedback

While applicants are telling their story, the interview board should provide neutral feedback. Avoid responding with positive words like “Good,” “Fantastic,” or “Excellent.” Also avoid negative phrases like “That’s unfortunate” or “Why did you do that?” Instead, give neutral feedback like “Thank you” and “That’s helpful.” Neutral feedback does not give a candidate the impression of how he or she is doing during the interview. It prohibits the candidate from thinking, “They liked that story, so I’ll tell more like that,” or the opposite, “They disliked that story, so I better not refer to that again.”

 

Structured Board Interview Training

In the most fruitful job interview situations, applicants tell their story in a conversational manner, based on a series of prompts supported by the CARE Technique. By following these interview Dos and Don’ts, interviewers can determine if a job candidate is the right match for the targeted jobs. 15dots offers expert-led virtual structured board interview training sessions in which participants gain the confidence and learn the techniques to be effective interviewers. Contact us to register or to learn more. 



Joe Nowlin earned his doctorate from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business.

During the past 40 years, he has designed, tested, and installed proprietary and unmatched selection procedures for manufacturing organizations, transforming and revolutionizing the way they do business, the level of success in hiring personnel and the methods that companies can use to replicate his results.

He has now adapted these proprietary systems for use in medium-sized and smaller organizations.

 

Read more posts by Joe Nowlin
Advanced Tips
Type Example Notes
Fuzzy kettle~ Contain terms that are close to the word kettle, such as cattle
Wild cat* Contain terms that begin with cat, such as category and the extact term cat itself
Exact-Single orange Contain the term orange
Exact-Phrase "dnn is awesome" Contain the exact phase dnn is awesome
OR orange bike Contain the term orange or bike, or both. OR, if used, must be in uppercase
orange OR bike
AND orange AND bike Contain both orange and bike. AND must be in uppercase
Combo (agile OR extreme) AND methodology Contain methodology and must also contain agile and/or extreme
Results per Page:
Limit the search results with the specified tags.
Limit the search results modified within the specified time.
Limit the search results from the specified source.
Search results must be an exact match for the keywords.

Hiring Hazards that Jeopardize a Job Interview

Hiring Hazards that Jeopardize a Job Interview

In my career at 15dots, I’ve had countless opportunities to serve on interview boards. As I welcome job candidates into an interview setting, I explain to them what to expect. Oftentimes, I tell them that everyone has a story to tell, and in this interview, you’ll have an opportunity to tell yours. I usually get a chuckle out of them when I say that I’ve done thousands of interviews, and nobody’s ever died during one of them!

Storytelling as an interview technique

A structured board interview designed by 15dots uses storytelling to determine a job candidate’s adaptation and motivation and how these behaviors match up with the targeted jobs. Serving on an interview panel is a huge responsibility, with specific Dos and Don’ts to keep in mind.

The Dos and Don’ts of Job Interviewing

Don’t ask a lot of questions

Instead of asking job applicants a bunch of questions, reframe the questions as gentle commands, which I call interview prompts. Start your command with words like, “Describe for me,” “Tell me about,” or “Give me a story about.” People often refer to this interview method as a behavioral interview. At 15dots, we developed a highly effective and repeatable interview protocol that includes more commands than questions. 

Do probe deeper with CARE®

As a follow-up to an interview prompt, you want to probe deeper into the candidate’s story by using the CARE® technique. CARE® is an acronym for Circumstance or Assignment, Response, and Effect. An example would be, “Tell me about a problem you had with a supervisor. What was the circumstance? What, if anything, did you do about it? What was the effect of your behavior?” 

Don’t ask illegal or in appropriate questions

Steer clear of asking illegal or inappropriate interview questions. Link to 5 Questions You Should Never Ask in a Job Interview Examples are, “Do you own a home?” “Do you go to church?” “Are you married?” “Do you have children?” In all likelihood, none of these questions are tied to the job itself. During interviewer training sessions, 15dots gives interviewers a quick-reference card that clearly spells out pertinent legal guidelines. By sticking to a prepared script of interview prompts, interviewers easily avoid any inappropriate or illegal interview questions. 

Do get personal – to a point

Some interviewers think that probing into a job candidate’s work life is too invasive. Sure, interviewers need to protect the privacy and integrity of an applicant. However, that doesn’t mean they can’t ask questions about attendance, physical capabilities related to the job, and safety. These factors are a prerequisite to performance. Examples of these types of prompts are: “Tell me about your safety record,” or “On any given day, how much are you required to push, pull, or lift?” or “Describe your attendance record over the past year.”

Do give neutral feedback

While applicants are telling their story, the interview board should provide neutral feedback. Avoid responding with positive words like “Good,” “Fantastic,” or “Excellent.” Also avoid negative phrases like “That’s unfortunate” or “Why did you do that?” Instead, give neutral feedback like “Thank you” and “That’s helpful.” Neutral feedback does not give a candidate the impression of how he or she is doing during the interview. It prohibits the candidate from thinking, “They liked that story, so I’ll tell more like that,” or the opposite, “They disliked that story, so I better not refer to that again.”

 

Structured Board Interview Training

In the most fruitful job interview situations, applicants tell their story in a conversational manner, based on a series of prompts supported by the CARE Technique. By following these interview Dos and Don’ts, interviewers can determine if a job candidate is the right match for the targeted jobs. 15dots offers expert-led virtual structured board interview training sessions in which participants gain the confidence and learn the techniques to be effective interviewers. Contact us to register or to learn more. 



Joe Nowlin earned his doctorate from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business.

During the past 40 years, he has designed, tested, and installed proprietary and unmatched selection procedures for manufacturing organizations, transforming and revolutionizing the way they do business, the level of success in hiring personnel and the methods that companies can use to replicate his results.

He has now adapted these proprietary systems for use in medium-sized and smaller organizations.

 

Read more posts by Joe Nowlin

 Neenah, WI 54956
920-309-1009
Email 15dots